1922 STEWART-WARNER WARNING HAND STOP LIGHT AD

First published May 15, 2014 in Old Cars Weekly

1922 STEWART-WARNER WARNING HAND STOP LIGHT AD – By: M. J. Frumkin

In the spring of 1922, Stewart-Warner Speedometer Corp. of Chicago offered exciting Stewart Products to accessorize cars in a commanding way whether coming or going.

At the rear, as seen in the adjacent advertisement, was a clever new idea in stop lights that was different than conventional units at the time. Within the round red transparent tail light lens was an illustrated hand along with the letters S-T-O-P, all edged by opaque black.

When the driver applied the brake, the “Red Hand” and letters shone a brilliant warning to trailing motorist. There was no way to misinterpret that message, almost like today’s “talk to the hand” gesture.

The $7 unit in this ad was listed as Stewart-Warner Model 134-B and came with a small signal light for the dash panel that flashed on and off with the rear fender stop light. This indicated to the driver that it was working each time he stepped on the pedal.

For $2 less, the Stewart-Warner Model 134-A came without the dash light.

Advertised separately, and to supplement the headlamps were Stewart Seachlights that clamped to the windshield frame and could be operated from inside the car.

These were offered in different sizes and designs for open and closed vehicles, and ranged in price from $5 to $12 each

Both the “warning hand” stop light and moveable front searchlights were campaigned to retailers around the world to “Brighten up your sales, dispel overhead gloom, and build up profits by handling Stewart Products – Used on 7 Million Cars.”

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